TOKYO FORUM 2019 Shaping the Future

Parallel Session 5

Theme

Urban Futures
DATE
Saturday 7, December
TIME
10:00-17:30
VENUE
Faculty of Science Bldg.1, Koshiba Hall 
LANGUAGE
English
ORGANIZER
Overview
In recent decades, research has intensified in humanities and social sciences fields in order to contribute to sustainable, equitable and healthy future urban societies around the globe. At the same time, scholars and practitioners in engineering, architecture and urban planning are tapping into these research findings, and are increasingly experimenting with tools and concepts from fields such sociology, history, anthropology, ethnic studies, art, and art history. What fresh insights can interdisciplinary approaches bring to our understanding of current urban development? Can the study of history and theory help us to expand the terms of current debates in planning and policy-making? Today’s panels bring together researchers from several disciplines in order to advance the dialogue between humanities/social science researchers and urban designers and planners. The panels will also apply methods from these fields to address the daunting global challenges to urban futures, including poverty, forced migration, climate change, demographic trends, disasters, inequalities, and health.

Agenda

Morning (one panel:2.5 hours)
1.Envisioning/Expanding Urban Futures
Moderator: Alison Isenberg, Co-Director, Princeton-Mellon Initiative in Architecture, Urbanism, and the Humanities; Professor of History, Princeton University
The morning panel focuses on Urban Futures models from different disciplines. It takes this premise as its starting point: How societies envision and imagine the future directly impacts the ways we build and plan our cities and cultures. In what ways can we expand these visions and apply this research for the greater good?
  • Annette Kim, Associate Professor Planning, Sol Price School of Public Policy, University of Southern California
  • Marshall Brown, Associate Professor of Architecture, Princeton University
  • Yokohari Makoto, Professor, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo
  • Eric Avila, Professor of Chicana/o Studies, History and Urban Planning, UCLA
  • Kusakabe Takahiko, Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo
  • Silvia Elena Giorguli Saucedo, President, College of Mexico/El Colegio de México
Afternoon (two panels:2 hours)
2.Urban Spectacle: Infrastructure and the Olympics
Moderator: Dianne Harris, Senior Program Officer, The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
Panel 2 takes the case study of Olympics planning to weigh the balance of vision, construction, and impact on cities. The Olympics offer a global framework while focusing on the lessons from individual cities and regions. What is the relationship between the business model of Olympics development and cities’ concrete needs as captured by urban planning and design? Does urban planning incorporate and advance the needs of cities and their citizens in Olympics case studies?
  • Bruno Carvalho, Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures, Harvard University
  • Franz Prichard, Associate Professor of East Asian Studies, Princeton University
  • Imaizumi Jugo, Director, Japan Sport Council
  • Yoshimi Shunya, Professor, Graduate School of Interdisciplinary Information Studies, The University of Tokyo
  • Judith Grant Long, Associate Professor, University of Michigan
3.The Future is Now: Cities on the Edge
Moderator: Bruno Carvalho, Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures, Harvard University

The third panel focuses on how cities face long-term demographic and economic transformations as well as immediate environmental, industrial, and wartime catastrophes. How do humanities, arts, and social science tools and concepts contribute to frameworks for constructive change?

  • Dietmar Offenhuber, Associate Professor of Public Policy and Urban Affairs, Northeastern University
  • Juan Du, Associate Professor, Department of Architecture, Hong Kong University
  • Meguro Kimiro, Professor, Graduate School of Interdisciplinary Information Studies, The University of Tokyo
  • Alison Isenberg, Co-Director, Princeton-Mellon Initiative in Architecture, Urbanism, and the Humanities; Professor of History, Princeton University
  • Orit Halpern, Associate Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Concordia University
  • Sheldon Garon, Nissan Professor in Japanese Studies; Professor of History and East Asian Studies, Princeton University

Panelists

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